The world has a third pole and it’s melting quickly

An IPCC report says two-thirds of glaciers on the largest ice sheet after the Arctic and Antarctic are set to disappear in 80 years Many moons ago in Tibet, the Second Buddha transformed a fierce nyen (a malevolent mountain demon) into a neri (the holiest protective warrior god) called Khawa Karpo, who took up residence in the sacred mountain bearing his name. Khawa Karpo is the tallest of the Meili mountain range, piercing the sky at 6,740 metres (22,112ft) above sea level. Local Tibetan communities believe that conquering Khawa Karpo is an act of sacrilege and would cause the deity to abandon his mountain home. Nevertheless, there have been several failed attempts by outsiders the best known by an international …

The science of senolytics: how a new pill could spell the end of ageing

A simple treatment to stave off the health problems of old age could be available in five to 12 years. Heres how it would work The science of extending life is a subject of morbid fascination, conjuring the image of old billionaires being cryogenically frozen. But imagine if, instead of a pill you could take to live for ever, there was a pill that could push back the ageing process a medicine that could stave off the fragility, osteoarthritis, memory loss, macular degeneration and cancers that plague old age. It could happen, with the science of senolytics: an emerging and highly anticipated area of anti-ageing medicine. Many of the worlds top gerontologists have already demonstrated the possibilities in animals and …

Malcolm Gladwell: Im just trying to get people to take psychology seriously

The Canadian writer made his name bringing intellectual sparkle to everyday subjects, and his new book – about how strangers interact with each other – is no exception In the flesh, Malcolm Gladwell is exactly as I imagined him to be: engaging, polite, dauntingly cerebral and supremely self-assured in that way that the exceptionally gifted often are. At 55, there is still something of the sporty, if slightly gawky, teenager about him; his jeans and a lightweight hoody accentuate his height and wiry thinness. The signature afro has been tamed somewhat and, if anything, makes him look even younger. He is not big on small talk, and one senses that every hour in his working day is geared towards maximum …

Jeffrey Epstein’s influence in the science world is a symptom of larger problems | Kate Darling

In a system stacked against women, we must direct our harshest judgment at people and institutions who remain silent Many of us are reeling from the recent news that MITs Media Lab, where I work as a researcher, took funding from Jeffrey Epstein, the late financier who faced federal sex-trafficking charges. For me, the Epstein connections dont stop there: Epstein had close ties to John Brockman, the founder of the heavy-hitting science literary agency that recently sold my first book. The Epstein web can appear inescapable, and for those entangled in it, theres a temptation to break out and cut all ties with his enablers. While I understand and respect that decision, Ive made a different one. I will not …

Driving an RC Car From Inside a Cylindrical Dome Projector

VR company Voysys is developing a 3D render engine optimised for ultra short latency when handling massive volumes of video in real-time. Using their proprietary software and a cylindrical dome projector, the company believes ‘teleoperation’ of vehicles will one day outperform human presence. In this demonstration, the company is ‘teleoperating’ an RC car around their office. Original Article : HERE ; The Ultimate Survival Food: The Lost Ways

The physics professor who says online extremists act like curdled milk

Hate may be less like a cancer and more like bubbles, says Neil Johnson, who applies physics theory to human behavior Lone wolves. Terrorist cells. Bad apples. Viral infections. The language we use to discuss violent extremism is rife with metaphors from the natural world. As we seek to understand why some humans behave so utterly inhumanely, we rely on comparisons to biology, ecology and medicine. But what if weve been working in the wrong scientific discipline? What if the spread of hate is less like the spread of cancer through the proverbial body politic and more like the formation of bubbles in a boiling pot of water? That is the contention of Neil Johnson, a professor of physics at …

The science of addiction: a personal struggle to kick cocaine gives a neuroscientist unique insights

Having survived a decade of drink and drugs as a young woman, Professor Judith Grisel focused all her determination on writing a book about addiction When guardianbookshop.com

For women like me, postponing the menopause would be a blessing | Sonia Sodha

Scientific advances that prolong fertility can only be a benefit to many would-be mothers Let us imagine for a moment that we lived in a world where male fertility dropped off a cliff by the time men hit their mid 40s, leaving a group of men who wanted to have children but couldnt. When would science have produced a fix? I am going to hazard a guess that it would have been quite some time ago. But it has taken until 2019 for a fledgling treatment to delay the menopause by up to 20 years to be offered to women, even though the idea has been around for treatment involves removing and freezing a small piece of ovarian tissue from …

Get to Know Maxwell’s EquationsYou’re Using Them Right Now

If you hang around with physics people long enough, some­one eventually will bring up Maxwell's equations. Maybe as part of a joke, or on a T-shirt or a tattoo. But they'll be somewhere. So even if you aren't a physics major, it won't hurt to get a basic understanding of these iconic equations. Maxwell's equations are sort of a big deal in physics. They're how we can model an electromagnetic wave—also known as light. Oh, it's also how most electric generators work and even electric motors. Essentially, you are using Maxwell's equations right now, even if you don't know it. Why are they called "Maxwell's equations"? That's after James Clark Maxwell. He was the 19th-century scientist who sort of put …

He, she, or … ? Gender-neutral pronouns reduce biases study

Researchers find usage boosts positive feelings towards women and LGBT people More than 100 failures litter the battleground that is the hunt for an English gender-neutral singular pronoun. From thon, ip and hiser to hem, ons and lers, the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, those who used gender-neutral pronouns for the cartoon task were more likely to use non-male names in their short story. The gender-neutral pronoun also appeared to improve positive feelings towards LGBT people. The word hen, the researchers believe, helped to combat mental biases that favoured men, and raise awareness of other genders. Sabine Sczesny, a professor of social psychology at the University of Bern, said the research was further evidence that gender-inclusive language could …

Americans Trust Scientists, Until Politics Gets in the Way

Nothing’s more American than a science-hero—an indomitable, big-brained hasher-out of ideas that change the world, that make the impossible possible. At least since Ben Franklin sat with the founders, and certainly since Vannevar Bush explicitly connected the US’ future to federal funding of science after World War II, the idea of sciencing the shit out of everything has been core to the American character. Like many surveys and studies before it, a new report from the Pew Research Center confirms this truth: Americans love and trust scientists. In 2019, 86 percent of Americans said they had a great deal or a fair amount of confidence in them—up 3 percent from the year before. That’s higher than confidence in the military …

Lunar Mysteries That Science Still Needs to Solve

This story is part of a series commemorating the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission. Picture this: After a three-day journey from Earth, Buzz Aldrin and Neil Armstrong are guiding the Apollo 11 lunar module to the surface of the moon. As they approach their landing spot in the Sea of Tranquility, they remark on the view—the deeply shadowed craters, the boulders littering the alien landscape, the fine dust that envelopes the spacecraft as it fires its descent engine for landing. But when the lander hits the surface, Aldrin and Armstrong notice something strange. The landscape appears to be rising; no, wait, the spacecraft is sinking. The 15-ton lunar module is being swallowed by the thick layer of moondust …

Elon Musks Mad Science Could Take Brain-Controlled Computing Mainstream

PayPal founder Elon Musk wants to put a modem in your brain, potentially allowing you to control computers, drones, and prosthetic limbs with your thoughts. Hes not alone. For years, university researchers and even the U.S. militarys own scientists have been tinkering with the same technology, aiming to improve the ways we interface with our devices and our own bodies. Veterans in the field of brain-computer interface research, or BCI, said Musks leap into the nascent industry could be a helpful jolt to a little-known but promising tech. But they also sounded a note of caution. Musk said Neuralink, his San Francisco-based BCI firm, will focus on developing implantable technology. In other words, the company would have to drill holes …

War on science: Trump administration muzzles climate experts, critics say

Whistleblowers and groups tracking agency decisions say administration is ignoring science and censoring expertise The Trump administration is disregarding science and expertise across a wide range of government work, as documented by whistleblowers and groups tracking agency decisions. Trump officials are censoring warnings about the climate crisis, moving critical agencies out of Washington and enacting far-reaching changes in what facts regulators can consider when they choose between industry and the public good. The White House and its agencies have kept their own experts from explaining how pollution from power plants and cars is increasing global temperatures, threatening both lives and economies. One former climate scientist for the National Park Service, Maria Caffrey, filed a whistleblower complaint this week and testified …

The science of influencing people: six ways to win an argument

Hidebound views on subjects such as the climate crisis and Brexit are the norm but science may sway stubborn opinions I am quite sure now that often, very often, in matters of religion and politics a mans reasoning powers are not above the monkeys, wrote Mark Twain. Having written a book about our most common reasoning errors, I would argue that Twain was being rather uncharitable to monkeys. Whether we are discussing Trump, Brexit, or the Tory leadership, we have all come across people who appear to have next to no understanding of world events but who talk with the utmost confidence and conviction. And the latest psychological research can now help us to understand why. Consider the overestimate their …