Rabbits may hold key to solving mystery of human female orgasm

Study suggests climax may be an evolutionary hangover but crucial questions remain A possible explanation for one of biologys greatest mysteries, the female orgasm, has been bolstered by research showing that rabbits given antidepressants release fewer eggs during sex. The human female orgasm has long proved curious, having no obvious purpose besides being pleasurable. The scientists behind the study have previously proposed it might have its evolutionary roots in a reflex linked to the release of eggs during sex a mechanism that exists today in several animal species, including rabbits. Since humans have spontaneous ovulation, the theory goes that female orgasm may be an evolutionary hangover. They say the new experiment supports the idea. We know there is a reflex …

The science of senolytics: how a new pill could spell the end of ageing

A simple treatment to stave off the health problems of old age could be available in five to 12 years. Heres how it would work The science of extending life is a subject of morbid fascination, conjuring the image of old billionaires being cryogenically frozen. But imagine if, instead of a pill you could take to live for ever, there was a pill that could push back the ageing process a medicine that could stave off the fragility, osteoarthritis, memory loss, macular degeneration and cancers that plague old age. It could happen, with the science of senolytics: an emerging and highly anticipated area of anti-ageing medicine. Many of the worlds top gerontologists have already demonstrated the possibilities in animals and …

For women like me, postponing the menopause would be a blessing | Sonia Sodha

Scientific advances that prolong fertility can only be a benefit to many would-be mothers Let us imagine for a moment that we lived in a world where male fertility dropped off a cliff by the time men hit their mid 40s, leaving a group of men who wanted to have children but couldnt. When would science have produced a fix? I am going to hazard a guess that it would have been quite some time ago. But it has taken until 2019 for a fledgling treatment to delay the menopause by up to 20 years to be offered to women, even though the idea has been around for treatment involves removing and freezing a small piece of ovarian tissue from …