‘Ecological grief’: Greenland residents traumatised by climate emergency

Islanders are struggling to reconcile impact of global heating with traditional way of life, survey finds The climate crisis is causing unprecedented levels of stress and anxiety to people in Greenland who are struggling to reconcile the traumatic impact of heating with their traditional way of life. The first ever national survey examining the human impact of the climate emergency, revealed in the Guardian on Monday, shows that more than 90% of islanders interviewed fully accept that crisis is happening, with a further 76% claiming to have personally experienced global heating in their daily lives, from coping with dangerous sea ice journeys to having sled dogs euthanised for economic reasons tied to shorter winters. Original Article : HERE ; The …

Trump administration weakens protections for animals near extinction

Changes to how Endangered Species Act is implemented come as world scientists warn biodiversity crisis will put humanity at risk The Trump administration is scaling back the US governments latitude to protect species nearing extinction, as world scientists warn that a biodiversity crisis will soon put humanity at risk. The 1,600 species are considered officially at risk in the US. A United Nations report this spring found humans are disrupting the natural world and putting North American wolverine, a species that depends on a cooler climate to survive. The 3ft-long creature, which resembles a small bear with a bushy tail, hunts across a vast range. But if temperatures rise at the expected rate, wolverines could lose a third of their …

What I learned writing about climate change and the US south for a year

I crisscrossed a region my own that is mired in a culture of denial and delay. The conversation on the climate crisis has not changed fast enough Its 96 degrees in downtown Beaufort, North Carolina, a place where I spent much of my childhood. The sidewalk is too hot for dogs to walk on. The iconic wild horses, visible on Shackleford Banks, wade in the marsh, munching cordgrass. Ive been watching the horses since I was in elementary school, and now Im sharing them with my elementary school-aged daughters on summer vacation. My girls love them, as I did. The legend is that the horses swam to safety from an old Spanish shipwreck. Its moving to watch the small, strong …

The science of influencing people: six ways to win an argument

Hidebound views on subjects such as the climate crisis and Brexit are the norm but science may sway stubborn opinions I am quite sure now that often, very often, in matters of religion and politics a mans reasoning powers are not above the monkeys, wrote Mark Twain. Having written a book about our most common reasoning errors, I would argue that Twain was being rather uncharitable to monkeys. Whether we are discussing Trump, Brexit, or the Tory leadership, we have all come across people who appear to have next to no understanding of world events but who talk with the utmost confidence and conviction. And the latest psychological research can now help us to understand why. Consider the overestimate their …

Museum of underwater art to open on Australia’s Great Barrier Reef

Submerged sculptures and others that appear at low tide to be installed at several Queensland sites, as part of a project that also aims to rehabilitate sections of the reef From a colour-changing figure warning of warming seas to a sunken skeletal greenhouse encrusted with coral, a new museum of underwater art in Australias Great Barrier Reef marine park aims to raise awareness of the threatened ecosystem and rehabilitate parts of the reef. Created by British sculptor and environmentalist Jason deCaires Taylor, the deCaires Taylor hopes the museum will help to shape public debate and inform environmental policy. Our oceans are going through rapid change, and there are huge threats, from rising sea temperatures to acidification, and a large amount …

New Designs Could Boost Solar Cells Beyond Their Limits

The sun blankets the Earth with enough photons every hour to meet the entire world’s energy needs for a year. The question is how to efficiently convert them into electricity. Even under small-scale laboratory conditions, the world’s best single-junction solar cells—the kind found in most solar panels—still max out at capturing 29 percent of the sun’s energy. That puts them just shy of the hard limit of about one third that solar researchers calculated half a century ago. But scientists studying photovoltaics—the process by which sunlight is converted into electricity—have also long suspected that this limit is not as hard as it once seemed. The ceiling on solar cell efficiency, known as the Shockley-Queisser limit, is between 29 and 33 …

Ancient city of Babylon heads list of new Unesco world heritage sites

UN also names national park in Iceland among sites protected for their value to humanity The ancient city of Babylon and an Icelandic national park replete with glaciers, ice caves and volcanoes are among the sites that have been added to Unescos world heritage list. More than 1,000 sites around the world some cultural, some natural, some both are protected by listing. Landmarks or areas are chosen for their value to humanity. On Friday, the World Heritage Committee announced the addition of the first of this years batch. More sites will be named over the weekend. Perhaps the most famous site to be added to the list is the city of Babylon in Iraq. The city was first mentioned in …

Desalination Is Booming as Cities Run out of Water

This story originally appeared on Yale Environment 360 and is part of the Climate Desk collaboration. Some 30 miles north of San Diego, along the Pacific Coast, sits the Claude “Bud” Lewis Carlsbad Desalination Plant, the largest effort to turn salt water into fresh water in North America. Each day 100 million gallons of seawater are pushed through semi-permeable membranes to create 50 million gallons of water that is piped to municipal users. Carlsbad, which became fully operational in 2015, creates about 10 percent of the fresh water the 3.1 million people in the region use, at about twice the cost of the other main source of water. Expensive, yes, but vital for the fact that it is local and …

Science institute that advised EU and UN ‘actually industry lobby group’

International Life Sciences Institute used by corporate backers to counter public health policies, says study An institute whose experts have occupied key positions on EU and UN regulatory panels is, in reality, an industry lobby group that masquerades as a scientific health charity, according to a peer-reviewed study. The Washington-based a 2015 email copied to ILSIs then director, Suzanne Harris, and executives from firms such as Coca-Cola and Monsanto, ILSIs founder Alex Malaspina, a former Coca-Cola vice-president, complained bitterly about new describes as a longtime scientific and regulatory affairs leader said he expected many nations to follow the new guidelines, adding: We have to consider how to become ready to mount a strong defence. According to ILSIs declared mandatory principles, …

Hospitals Arent Ready for a Mass Casualty Wildfire

Of all the wildfires that ravaged California in 2018, the Camp Fire was the deadliest. It tore through the mountain town of Paradise and killed at least 85 people, destroying the local Feather River Hospital along the way—so just as emergency services were trying to evacuate and tend to the injured, they also had to transport admitted patients. That moment made real a problem that specialists had been warning about for years. “There were four beds immediately available in the entirety of Northern California for a burn patient. Everyone else was going to have to wing it,” says Tina Palmieri, director of the Firefighters Burn Center at UC Davis, which would receive 10 burn victims from the Camp Fire alone. …

The Midwest’s Farms Face an Intense, Crop-Killing Future

The flooding that devastated the Midwest this spring damaged infrastructure and prevented farmers from getting crops planted on time. Though scientists can’t say if one storm or one wet season is the result of climate change, so far this year’s heavy rains are a perfect illustration of what scientific models of climate change predict for the region. And it’s only going to get more intense. Those models warn that it’s going to get hotter, and that rain will continue to arrive in increasingly intense spring bursts, leaving long dry patches in the summer. “We’re fighting it at both ends in the Midwest right now. Too much too early and not enough late,” says Evan DeLucia, a professor of plant biology …

Call to arms: how can Australia avoid a slow and painful decline?

Australia has been warned it risks drifting into the future if it fails to respond to challenges in a fast-changing world Australia is at a crossroads. Drift towards a future of slow decline economically and socially or, if action is taken now to address our most important challenges, create a future of greater prosperity for all, globally competitive industries and a sustainable environment. That is the conclusion of a major report bringing together the thinking of more than 50 leaders in business, academia, NGOs and the community sector, working with the CSIRO to model alternative futures for Australia. The report is described as a clarion call for the nation. The Australian National Outlook 2019, two years in the making, aims …

There’s a climate crisis but Trump’s cabinet continues to backtrack on science | Kate Aronoff

Conservative donors and fossil fuel companies have the most to lose from large-scale decarbonization and they know it In an effort to suppress federal climate research, the Trump administration will direct state agencies to no longer consider worst-case scenarios of global warming. Climate modelers working for federal agencies will only be permitted to forecast to 2040, decades before the as-much-as 8C degrees of global warming that could take place by 2100 if we continue on our current path. William Happer most recently famous for written, with their desperate need to deny the reality of global warming, or belittle its implications, nonetheless understand something that is fundamentally true. To avert climate chaos, we need to challenge the free-market fundamentalism that has …

White House physicist sought aid of rightwing thinktank to challenge climate science

William Happer contacted Heartland Institute, one of the most prominent groups to dispute that fossil fuels cause global heating A member of the climate crisis, a trove of his emails show. Jim Bridenstine, the Nasa administrator, had accepting the science of climate breakdown. In May 2018, an exchange between Happer and Heartlands Wysmuller called Bridenstines change of heart a puzzle and copied in the temperature increases and Nasas deputy administrator, about emissions actually benefit the planet rather than drive harmful climate disruption, once claiming that carbon dioxide has been demonized much like the poor Jews under Hitler. The physicist was previously a leader and co-founder of an advocacy group called the Mercer Family Foundation and the Noaa) and the Environmental …

Revealed: Mobil sought to fight environmental regulation, documents show

Revealed: documents from the early 1990s show oil giant looked to make tax-exempt donations to promote the companys interests Oil giant Mobil sought to make tax-exempt donations to leading universities, civic groups and arts programmes to promote the companys interests and undermine environmental regulation, according to internal documents from the early 1990s obtained by the Guardian. The documents shine a light on the ways corporations have used their money to buy influence, amass prestige and shape public policy through grants to academic programmes and advocacy groups. The documents come to light as ExxonMobil, formed when Mobil merged with Exxon in 1999, is now recommended contributing a total of $25,000 to the Harvard Center for Risk Analysis, saying the center had …

Climate crisis: aviation industry hears clamour for electric planes

Shift from fossil fuels top of agenda for Paris air show, industry having lagged behind other sectors Faced with growing calls for action on the climate crisis, aerospace companies gathering for the Paris air show next week are turning their thoughts to a future run on electricity rather than fossil fuels. The scale of the challenge is considerable. The target for net zero carbon emissions by 2050, recommended by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and emissions laggard compared with the car industry or power generation, but improvements in the German startup Lilium and US firm Bell Helicopter small hybrid-electric commuter aircraft to market in the early 2020s, and Aurora Flight Sciences, which is also targeting air taxis. Yet for …