TikTok dudes are dipping their balls in soy sauce for ‘science’

Two decades after sketch group the State declared, I wanna dip my balls in it, its become a challenge on TikTok. According to BuzzFeed, a 2013 Daily Mail article that claims Testicles have taste buds seems to be the origin; it was recirculated by user @cryinginthecar, who asked anyone with testicles to dip them in something to test out the science. This young man dabbed his testicles with soy sauce, which is reportedly one of the flavors they can taste, and apparently had a sensation. Guys tried to joke about it, but there were also some Kombucha girl-level taste journeys. Not everyone tried soy sauce. Elsewhere, the need to know was causing some tension in relationships. Fortunately, a hot doctor …

The battle between science and skepticism

(CNN)At a time when almost everything is politicized, vaccination has planted itself squarely on the national stage. On the other, are public health officials who point to unprecedented measles outbreaks that have sickened thousands in the US as proof that vaccine exemptions cause health crises. They’re calling on states to eliminate exemptions entirely. With 2020 legislative sessions kicking off in most states this month, this push and pull between science and skepticism is playing out across the country. More and more lawmakers are proposing bills, seeking to either boost, or limit, mandatory vaccinations for schoolchildren. “I won’t be surprised if we see many pro-vaccine bills this year,” said Dr. Sean O’Leary, a member of the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee …

Budding crime writers get the science right

Image caption CAHID recently opened a new teaching lab at Dundee University Fellow graduate Zoe Cooper said the course’s attention to detail informed her dissertation. a television pilot script set in Perth. She said: “We did the history of forensics, how they developed everything from DNA, what poisons would work, how you actually kill someone. “A lot of times when you see things on television, it’s not actually how they would manage to do it.” The two-year course includes creative writing as well as covering forensic science and law. The course was the idea of Prof Tracey Wilkinson, director of Dundee University’s Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification (CAHID). She believed blending the university’s highly-regarded creative writing tutors with her …