What Seinfeld can teach us about science

From micro pigs to the doping dangers of a poppy seed bagel, life may be imitating the US sitcom When Jerry Seinfeld UK 1981 HBO debut, he said of weather forecasts: And then my favourite part, the satellite photo. This is really helpful. A photograph of the Earth from 10,000 miles away. Can you tell if you should take a sweater or not from that shot? His eponymous 90s sitcom is also packed with nuanced references to science, with the storylines of some of the most famous episodes centred on it: George Costanza pretends to be a scientist in The Marine Biologist, while in The Abstinence he becomes a boffin after swearing off sex. In The Non-Fat Yogurt, Kramer has …

People Use Science To Prove Disney Has To Change The Lead Actor Of The Little Mermaid Cause She Cant Be Black

Recently, Disney announced that singer Halle Bailey will star as Ariel in The Little Mermaid remake chloexhalle Some people are trying really hard to find a reason why Ariel cant be black, and they even turned to “science” nuevalano Image credits: Image credits: However, they were instantly shut down Image credits: Image credits: Image credits: People simply aren’t buying their “theories” MouthyOldBat __CBeezy MadamnSJ writerTQB korcariwilds Necrophidian Image credits: Image credits: Image credits: Image credits:

Can’t Set Off Fireworks? Try These Science-Backed Alternatives

The Fourth of July, Independence Day, America’s birthday—whatever you want to call it, this holiday is a time for celebration. As it evokes the rich history of a proud, tumultuous country, the Fourth of July reminds us of all that we have in common, of the single, shared yearning that resides deep in the heart of every human being: the desire to blow things up. July Fourth is a holiday designed to terrify dogs and assert America’s dominance through firepower. Fireworks are visceral and exciting. But for some people, launching or even watching fireworks is not an option. Maybe you’re shackled by local noise ordinances, or are a conscientious resident of wildfire country. Maybe you just live in a state …

Coco Gauff took a science test just before trying to qualify for Wimbledon. She’s now an international sensation

(CNN)Before her sensational debut in Wimbledon’s main draw, 15-year-old American tennis player Cori “Coco” Gauff had to win some qualifying matches just to get there. READ: Gauff signs multi-year sponsorship contract She says only one of her teachers even knew she played tennis. The rest will know now. “I ended up getting a B on the exam, which was pretty good, considering I took it at 11 at night and I have to wake up the next day for a match,” Gauff told CNN’s Christina Macfarlane on Saturday, two days before she’d play Williams. “After my science test, I guess some of my teachers saw (an) interview. Before that … only one teacher knew I play tennis, and I don’t …

Kid Whose Fish Accidentally Swam in Spicy Water Gets Comforted with Science

What these parents thought was a “miracle” actually turned out to be a stupid accident. Thankfully, peppers are spicy as a deterrent for mammals, so there’s a decent chance the fish wasn’t hurt by the potentially catostrophic mistake. For a time when spicy peppers did end up inflicting some burn, here’s a time a kid’s hot sauce mistake damned an entire party to a choking hell. 1 3 5 7 http://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/mythbusters/mythbusters-database/chilies-shark-deterrent/

In Response To Disney’s Casting News, Racists Attempt To Prove Mermaids Can’t Be Black Using “Science”

On Wednesday, Disney announced that Halle Bailey of Chloe x Halle will be playing the starring role of Ariel in the upcoming live-action remake of animated movie, The Little Mermaid. – It seems like good casting. With a lot of singing required, who better than a Grammy-nominated singer in the right age range to play the lead? – Of course, some (white) people aren’t happy. In fact, people who apparently consider themselves the “master race” have spent the past two days on social media throwing a tantrum because the newest portrayal of imaginary cartoon descendants of a man who banged a fish isn’t quite white enough for their tastes.  They’re so mad that some of them have now started to try and use “science” to …

24-Year-Old Biochemist Wins Miss Virginia Title After Doing A Science Experiment As Her Talent

24-year-old biochemist Camille Schrier was crowned the new Miss Virginia recently, after showcasing her talents onstage in the form of a science experiment. Virginia beauty pageant contestant Camille Schrier showed a rather unusual talent for these kinds of shows Image credits: “Elephant Toothpaste” reaction. Rick Myers / Miss Virginia Ms. Schrier said that it was the recent overhaul to the competition, which now places greater value on true talents and social impact over appearance, that encouraged her to enter the pageant circuit again. “The evolution of the Miss America competition, which reflects greater inclusiveness, and an opportunity to make a difference and win scholarships inspired me to step forward this year and compete,” she told  Image credits: She won not …

How to watch the Science Channel online for free

Mythbusters Jr.Mythbusterswith explosions. The venerable, oddly soothing calls the Science Channel home, as does , the sustainability-focused docuseries spun off from the BBCs . You can catch shows about engineering disasters and skyscraper engineering. The long-running is a fascinating exploration of the cosmos. NASAs Unexplained Filesnot Im not saying its aliens, butHeres everything you need to know to watch the Science Channel online. How to watch the Science Channel for free Sling Sling Orange + Blue $25-$40 per month :s,,,, Xbox One Google Chromecast : local availability hereDish Networks foray into over-the-internet live TV is the most popular such service in the U.S. Thats no surprise, given the low barrier to entry it offers for many of the most popular …

Science institute that advised EU and UN ‘actually industry lobby group’

International Life Sciences Institute used by corporate backers to counter public health policies, says study An institute whose experts have occupied key positions on EU and UN regulatory panels is, in reality, an industry lobby group that masquerades as a scientific health charity, according to a peer-reviewed study. The Washington-based a 2015 email copied to ILSIs then director, Suzanne Harris, and executives from firms such as Coca-Cola and Monsanto, ILSIs founder Alex Malaspina, a former Coca-Cola vice-president, complained bitterly about new describes as a longtime scientific and regulatory affairs leader said he expected many nations to follow the new guidelines, adding: We have to consider how to become ready to mount a strong defence. According to ILSIs declared mandatory principles, …

Trumps Attack On Climate Science Echoes Big Oils 1998 Denial Campaign

In a , the main trade association for the U.S. oil and gas industry ― the American Petroleum Institute ― laid out plans for a multi-year, multi-million dollar campaign to sow doubt about the scientific consensus on climate change.  The U.S. and dozens of other nations had recently adopted the Kyoto Protocol, an international treaty to reduce planet-warming greenhouse gas emissions. Fossil fuel giants and allied right-wing think tanks mobilized to stymie the effort to rein in emissions, pledging to “identify, recruit and train a team of five independent scientists to participate in media outreach,” according to the draft plan, by The New York Times.   The institute’s team would produce a “steady stream” of opinion pieces for newspapers, develop a …

Would You Return A Lost Wallet? Science Says, Yes

Picture the scene: you are walking back home when you stumble upon a lost wallet, stuffed with $10 bills. What do you do? Do you A: walk on by, B: hand it in, or C: take the money? To find out whether material self-interest trumps civic duty (or vice versa), researchers from the US and Switzerland planted 17,303 wallets in 350 cities across 40 countries and waited to see who attempted to return the “lost” item.  The results, published in the journal Science, show (shockingly!) people are more likely to return a lost wallet with cash than a lost wallet without. And the more money inside the wallet, the more likely it is to be returned. Is it proof that we are all driven by …