Comply Or Defy? Democrats Test Trump’s Impeachment Strategy

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Rep. Adam Schiff, the intelligence committee chairman, issued a blunt warning to the president Wednesday, threatening to make White House defiance of a congressional request for testimony and documents potential grounds for an article of impeachment. “We want to make it abundantly clear that any effort by (Secretary of State Mike Pompeo), by the president or anyone else to interfere with the Congress’ ability to call before it relevant witnesses will be considered as evidence of obstruction of the lawful functions of Congress,” Schiff said in a Wednesday news conference. The White House strategy toward congressional oversight has often been open scorn. The Republican president’s aides have ignored document requests and subpoenas, invoked executive privilege …

Kim Gordon: ‘There’s a wall of faceless men I have to climb over’

Shes the art-rock legend who made Sonic Youth punk and now, at 66, she has made her first solo record. She drives our writer through LA to talk Donald Trump, existential angst and her anthem called Air BnB Before she came to typify deadpan Downtown New York cool, Kim Gordon was a teenager in 1970s Los Angeles, smoking pot and listening to Joni Mitchell. It was the pot that landed her in Disney jail. Gordon and her friend were in a cave on pirate-themed Tom Sawyers Island, lighting up a joint, when the Disney cops swooped in. They took us underground, Gordon recalls to a netherworld where she saw Mickey Mouse with a walkie-talkie and endured creepy comments from the …

3 Scientists Win Nobel Medicine Prize For Work On How Cells Adapt To Oxygen Availability

The Nobel award-giving body said U.S.-born researchers William Kaelin and Gregg Semenza shared the prize equally with Peter Ratcliffe, who was born in Britain. Their research established the basis for the understanding of how oxygen levels affect cellular metabolism and physiological functions, the institute said. Medicine is the first of the Nobel Prizes awarded each year. The prizes for achievements in science, peace and literature have been awarded since 1901 and were created in the will of dynamite inventor and businessman Alfred Nobel. Last year (Reporting by Niklas Pollard and Simon Johnson; additional reporting by Anna Ringstrom, Johannes Hellstrom, Johan Ahlander and Helena Soderpalm in Stockholm, Editing by Raissa Kasolowsky and Timothy Heritage) REAL LIFE. REAL NEWS. REAL VOICES. Help …

Inside the Deepfake Arms Race

By late 2018, Ali Bongo, the president of Gabon in West Africa, hadnt appeared in public for many months after reportedly suffering a stroke. So it came as a surprise when a seemingly official video appeared online on New Years Day depicting Bongo, looking a bit disoriented, addressing the Gabonese people. Bongos rivals declared the video to be a deepfakea sophisticated digital forgery. Bongo was dead or incapacitated, the opposition declared. On Jan. 7, army officers wrote in a May essay. A deepfake video, still image, or audio recording is the product of a clever bit of coding called a generative adversarial network, or GAN. A GAN has two components: a discriminator and a generator. The discriminator is trying to …

How To Get Free Workout Classes In NYC | Betches

? (Okay, maybe that was a bad example because everybody loves cupcakes, but you know what I mean.) That’s because it’s basically a scientific fact that things are significantly better when they don’t cost money. Another prime example of this phenomenon in action is workout classes, which, if you live in New York, usually cost the equivalent of a human soul, so finding any kind of deal that offers free workout classes is better than your f*ck buddy telling you he’s finally Anyway, even though New York robs us every damn day, sometimes this godforsaken city gives back and offers us free workout classes when we’re new to a studio. So if you want to get swole while you save …

Zoo Asks For Womans Help In Repairing Butterflys Wings, She Gives It A Transplant

Some people volunteer at animal shelters, others save kittens who accidentally gambol onto the road, while the founder of Insect Art repairs the wings of butterflies! The woman, who makes jewelry from real insects, is an expert at repairing butterfly wings, doing wing transplants, and making sure that these beautiful insects are restored to glory. This is a meticulous process that requires patience, dexterity, and a real passion for butterflies. Scroll down for Bored Panda’s exclusive in-depth interview with Katie VanBlaricum, the woman who was responsible for the butterfly’s successful wing transplant. As unbelievably cool as it sounds, Insect Art’s founder isn’t the only person doing surgery on butterflies: be sure to read Bored Panda’s post about Romy McCloskey and how …

Jon Huntsman Fast Facts

(CNN)Here’s a look at the life of Jon Huntsman, former Utah Governor and 2012 Republican Presidential Candidate. Father: Jon Meade Huntsman Sr., billionaire chemical magnate Mother: Karen (Haight) Huntsman Marriage: Mary Kaye Cooper (1983-present) Children: Asha Bharati, adopted from India; Gracie Mei, adopted from China; William, Jon III, Elizabeth, Abigail and Mary Anne Education: Attended University of Utah, 1978-1980; University of Pennsylvania, B.A. in Political Science, 1987 Religion: Mormon Other Facts:Dropped out of high school in his senior year to play piano with local bands. The University of Utah, at the time, allowed completion of high school coursework after admission. Served a two-year Mormon mission in Taiwan. Speaks fluent Mandarin Chinese. Worked as legislative intern for Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-UT). …

50 Times When Students Realized They Have Absolutely Awesome Teachers (New Pics)

Teachers don’t have to be stuffy, boring, and angry — they can be the most awesome and hilarious authority figures in your life. Those people are educators who go above and beyond the call of duty, using humor and shock to help their students learn about life. Bored Panda collected the most exquisite examples of teachers doing funny things, so you can enjoy yourself while waiting for the weekend to start. It’s lists like these that really make you appreciate school more and not groan when thinking of an approaching Monday. Scroll down, upvote your favorite pictures, and leave a comment somewhere below about the funniest teacher stories that you know. And be sure to share this post with your …

Incredible Fossils Shed Light On Mysterious Sharks That Lived 360 Million Years Ago

During the Devonian era, mysterious sharks with bizarre teeth and sinuous bodies swam the seas. Until now, we’ve only known about them from teeth and fin spines, but researchers have finally uncovered skeletal remains in Morocco, shedding light on what these strange toothy fishes were like. Describing their finds in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the researchers uncovered near-complete skeletal remains, including several skulls, from two different species belonging to the genus Phoebodus. Shark skeletons are notoriously tricky to stumble upon because they are made out of cartilage, not bone. “It is hard to find shark skeletons of this completeness and quality because they are made out of cartilage,” first author Linda Frey, of the Palaeontologocial Institute and …

Failure Can Be The Seed Of Scientific Career Success

For every young scientist struggling to establish themselves, we bring good news. Not only are difficulties at the start of the career no barrier to eventual scientific triumph, they may even help. Just as film heroes must suffer a crushing defeat to make victory more interesting, it seems scientists who have experienced some bad luck are more likely to scale the peaks of success than those who find it all smooth sailing. Dr Yang Wang and Dr Dashun Wang (no relation but both at Northwestern University) collected the applications for National Institutes of Health grants between 1990 and 2005. They then tracked the careers of those who were still establishing themselves, and had either narrowly succeeded, or just missed out. …

A startup factory? $1.2B-exit team launches $65M super{set}

Think Jack Dorsey’s jobs are tough? Well, Tom Chavez is running six startups. He thinks building businesses can be boiled down to science, so today he’s unveiling his laboratory for founding, funding and operating companies. He and his team have already proven they can do it themselves after selling their startups Rapt to Microsoft and Krux to Salesforce for a combined $1.2 billion. Now they’ve raised a $65 million fund for “super{set}”, an enterprise startup studio with a half-dozen companies currently in motion. The idea is that {super}set either conceptualizes a company or brings in founders whose dream they can make a reality. The studio provides early funding and expertise while the startup works from their shared space in San …

Rabbits may hold key to solving mystery of human female orgasm

Study suggests climax may be an evolutionary hangover but crucial questions remain A possible explanation for one of biologys greatest mysteries, the female orgasm, has been bolstered by research showing that rabbits given antidepressants release fewer eggs during sex. The human female orgasm has long proved curious, having no obvious purpose besides being pleasurable. The scientists behind the study have previously proposed it might have its evolutionary roots in a reflex linked to the release of eggs during sex a mechanism that exists today in several animal species, including rabbits. Since humans have spontaneous ovulation, the theory goes that female orgasm may be an evolutionary hangover. They say the new experiment supports the idea. We know there is a reflex …

Thumbs up: can you text 38 words a minute?

According to a new study, two-thumb texters are almost as fast as keyboard users. We take to the streets to see if the public are up to speed The human thumb, being opposable, is a blessed thing: we can hold a pen, send a text or play thumb war as the mood takes us. Todays digital natives will have learned to type before they crawl, and are capable of bashing out a Hey, you up? text faster than the brain can process that it is a bad decision. But not everyone is as lightning-fast: all of us know a one-finger typer, whether it is the co-worker who takes an eternity to reply to an email, or the beloved grandparent who …

Bad ancestors: does the climate crisis violate the rights of those yet to be born?

The long read: Our environmental vandalism has made urgent the question of ethical responsibilities across decades and centuries What if climate breakdown is a violation of the rights of those yet to be born? Finally, this urgent question seems to be getting the attention it deserves. Last month an astonishing 7 million people from nearly 200 countries took to the streets as part of the youth-led global climate strike. Young people around the world recognise that the disastrous repercussions of the already present ecological crisis will fall disproportionately on their shoulders, and the shoulders of generations to come in particular on those whose communities have emitted the smallest proportion of greenhouse gasses. Greta Thunberg, whose school strike for the climate …

Difficult but rewarding work: Planting trees to aid climate

In a corner of the Peruvian Amazon, where illegal gold mining has scarred forests and poisoned ground, scientists work to change wasteland back to wilderness. More than 3,000 miles to the north, on former coal mining land across Appalachia, workers rip out old trees that never put down deep roots and make the soil more suitable to regrow native tree species. In Brazil, a nursery owner grows different kinds of seedlings to help reconnect forests along the country’s Atlantic coast, benefiting endangered species like the golden lion tamarin. They labor amid spectacular recent losses — the Amazon jungle and the Congo basin ablaze, smoke from Indonesian rainforests wafting over Malaysia and Singapore, fires set mostly to make way for cattle …

How Fossil Fuel Companies Are Killing Plastic Recycling

So many things we buy come packaged in containers or wrappers that are meant to be used once, thrown away and forgotten ― but they don’t break down and can linger in the environment long after we’re gone. It’s tempting to think that we can this problem away, that if we’re more diligent about placing discarded bottles and bags into the curbside bin, we’ll somehow make up for all the trash overflowing landfills, choking waterways and killing marine life. For decades, big petrochemical companies responsible for extracting and processing the fossil fuels that make plastics have egged on consumers, reassuring them that recycling was the answer to our . Just last month, Royal Dutch Shell executive Hilary Mercer that the …